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Spotlight

Blog

Seeking Proposals for Website and Database Development

Thursday, 18 January 2018
by Annika Chiasson
The NBEN is seeking proposals for:

1. Updated look for Our Website
2. On-line interactive Risks & Benefits Calculator (plus Appendix)

Proposals are due January 29, 2018.

National Spotlight on Moncton

Monday, 27 November 2017
by Raissa Marks
The NBEN is pleased to be the local host partner for EconoUs 2018, the annual conference of the Canadian Community Economic Development Network, which is coming to Moncton in September 2018.
ECONOUS LOGOS 2018 w tag

With a focus on green community economic development, EconoUs 2018 will feature leading speakers, engaging sessions, and tailored networking opportunities about People (inclusive communities), Planet (sustainable environments), and Economy (local prosperity) and how these things, together, create an economy that works for all.Who or what should be included in the agenda?  Let the planning committee know here:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V2QXMY2

News From Groups

Act today to protect the Nashwaak River from the Sisson Mine

Thursday, 12 April 2018
by Corey Robichaud

For generations, families from Napadogan to Stanley, Taymouth to Marysville, and many points in between and beyond, have flocked to the banks of the Nashwaak River and its beautiful tributaries to swim, fish, paddle and — of course — forage for fresh fiddleheads.

This legacy is threatened by a proposal to build a large open-pit mine and tailings waste facility at the headwaters of the pristine watershed.
The Sisson Partnership is currently applying for permission to dump mining waste into portions of the Nashwaak watershed. The federal government, through Environment and Climate Change Canada, is accepting comments from the public until May 3, 2018.

We’ve partnered with our friends at the Nashwaak Watershed Association and other concerned groups to make it easy for you to speak up for the Nashwaak watershed, the people and families who live along and downstream of its banks, and the wildlife, including brook trout and Atlantic salmon, who depend upon the health of these waters.

Use our pre-written letter (that you can edit/add
with your concerns and story) to have your say today.



Want to know more about the proposed Sisson Mine and the risk it poses to the Nashwaak and downstream communities like Napadogan, Stanley, Taymouth, Marysville and Fredericton?

Spraying costs now hit $2.8 million/year

Thursday, 22 March 2018
by Vern
New Brunswick residents are paying private forestry corporations more than ever to apply herbicides on public lands.

Documents obtained by Stop Spraying New Brunswick through the right to information process show that in 2015, the government spent $2.3 million to subsidize herbicide application on public land, with an additional $419,498 spent on spraying private lands.
In 2016 the costs were about the same, with $2.29 million spent to spray public land, with a program total of $2.77 million Last year, the total subsidy increased to $2.86 million.
“The increased costs make no sense, given the public demands to end the practice of herbicide spraying,” said Vern Faulkner, the communcations director for Stop Spraying New Brunswick. “This taxpayer subsidy is one of the many reasons more and more people each day call for an end to herbicide spraying.”
In 2017, some 15,841 hectares of public land were sprayed with herbicides despite a petition from more than 35,000 residents calling for an end to this practice.
Glyphosate – the main ingredient in the herbicides applied to Crown land – has been scientifically linked to reproductive defects, liver issues, cancers and a wide array of other health concerns. Further, it has been shown to cause long-term damage to aquatic species and insects, including pollinators like bees. Many in the province also believe the spraying program is part of a larger mismanagement of forests that has led to diminished deer populations.
Herbicides are applied to Crown lands to eliminate hardwood species that forestry companies do not consider valuable, despite business cases showing that harvest of maple and birch products could take place with benefit to the economy.
“The government is not only ignoring calls to end spraying, it is spending more each year to have a dangerous chemical applied to our forests. It’s a slap in the face to the thousands of citizens who have asked their government to do the right thing,” said Faulkner.
Representatives of SSNB will be on hand at the Moncton Sportsman’s Show at the Moncton Coliseum, running Friday to Sunday.

CPAWS NB Commentary: New Brunswick needs to step up to federal billion dollar nature plan

Wednesday, 21 March 2018
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
Supporters of nature, wilderness and wildlife are applauding the federal government’s historic investment of $1.3 billion over 5 years to protect more nature across Canada. This unprecedented investment will enable Canada to achieve its commitment to protect at least 17% of our land and freshwater by 2020.
To date, Canada has protected 10.6% of our landscape. New Brunswick has protected 4.6 % of the province. With this level of cooperation across the country, now is the time for New Brunswick to advance beyond its current status at the back of the pack, and show leadership on both land and sea. The New Brunswick government needs to step up to establish an action plan that will protect our crucial natural areas.

This momentous decision should be a game-changer for nature conservation across Canada, including in New Brunswick. For the first time, the federal budget includes significant support for provinces, territories, and Indigenous governments’ work to establish more protected areas. This cost-shared model is similar to the way we deliver other shared priorities in Canada, such as infrastructure, climate change mitigation, and health care.

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick (CPAWS NB) and our supporters are hopeful this is an opportunity for the New Brunswick government to receive much needed funding to support the creation of new protected areas in our province. New Brunswickers need to show our decision-makers that we support strong efforts to protect more of our nature. Politicians and government leaders need to rally collective action to achieve conservations goals. We all have a role to play in protecting what is important to us.

New Brunswickers depend upon natural areas for flood control, clean air and drinking water, habitat for wildlife and pollinators, and green and blue spaces for healthy outdoor recreation. Yet, we don’t have a robust action plan to protect these areas. As a result, they are being degraded and lost to expanding industrial and urban development, and growing impacts of climate change.

Parks, protected areas and nature contribute millions of dollars to our provincial economy, including in rural areas. They support thousands of jobs and businesses in tourism. If we expand our opportunities to visit and explore protected nature, on land and sea, we can drive a more sustainable economy.
New Brunswickers are deeply connected to nature. It underpins our economy, culture, history, health and well-being. Nature is also our best protection from the impacts of climate change, as long as we conserve the natural resilience of our forests, rivers, wetlands and ocean.

Our government has immediate opportunities to protect more of New Brunswick’s nature. A proposal is in the works, from a community level, to establish a Restigouche Wilderness Waterway - a wide protected corridor that could link up with protected forest areas along the river. This would establish a world-class ecotourism destination in rural northern New Brunswick, and protect and grow businesses that depend upon nature, such as salmon angling, canoeing, nature tours and hiking.

The government should establish protected natural areas in the largest remaining old forest habitats on Crown land, and on provincially significant wetlands and bogs. Critical for the survival of many kinds of wildlife, these rich habitats also help slow or prevent climate change impacts.

New Brunswick’s coastal shores shelter internationally important mudflats, islands and rocky beaches, so these should be part of the mix to protect our treasured natural heritage. The provincial government also needs to cooperate with the federal government to find ways of protecting the natural wonders of the Bay of Fundy, the Northumberland Strait and the Bay of Chaleur.

The budget acknowledges the leadership of Indigenous peoples in conservation across Canada. This funding will help advance their work in New Brunswick, and allow us to work together, in reconciliation, for protection of the nature that supports us all.

Our New Brunswick Ministers responsible for parks, protected areas and wildlife will be meeting in late March with their government colleagues from across the country. Together, they will agree on a path forward for each jurisdiction, and for the country. CPAWS New Brunswick will be working hard to make sure that our leaders create an ambitious nature conservation agenda for New Brunswick. We encourage New Brunswickers to add their voices in support of this historic opportunity.

Published March 7, 2018 in the "Daily Gleaner" and the Moncton "Times and Transcript".

by Roberta Clowater, Executive Director, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – New Brunswick Chapter.

Green Jobs

Summer Job: NBEN Health & Education Programs Assistant

Thursday, 29 March 2018
by Raissa Marks
Here’s your chance to join a dynamic and passionate team while contributing to New Brunswick’s environmental movement! Employer: New Brunswick Environmental Network, a non-profit, bilingual communication network linking over 100 environmental groups across the province.  The network is the heartbeat of New Brunswick’s environmental movement, with a mission “to encourage and facilitate networking and communication among member groups in order to advance their work, to protect the Earth, to promote ecologically sound ways of life and to strengthen the environmental movement in New Brunswick.”

Salary: $12.00 / hour for 37.5 hours per week

Term of employment: Summer student position (up to 14 weeks) with a flexible start date finishing by August 31, 2018; Monday to Friday during office hours, with possibility of occasional evening and weekend work

Location: Moncton, New Brunswick

Position Requirements: To be eligible for this position you must:
  • have been a full-time student in the semester preceding the job
  • intend to return to full-time studies in the semester following the job
Position’s Duties and Responsibilities: The Health & Education Programs Assistant will assist in the implementation of a number of projects designed to (1) develop engagement in sustainability education initiatives, and (2) to promote children’s environmental health.  Other duties related to stakeholder engagement in environmental issues may be assigned. 

Requirements:
• Organizational and coordination skills
• Strong oral and written communications skills in English and French
• Strong computer skills
• Out-going and personable

Assets:
• Capable of working in a flexible work environment
• Ability to work independently but also a co-operative team player
• Quick learner and a highly motivated self-starter
• Creative and resourceful
• Background in the environmental or non-profit sector
• Interest in or passion for environmental issues

How to Apply: Please send resume and cover letter to Raissa Marks, Executive Director, nben@nben.ca

Application deadline: Friday, April 20, 2018

While the New Brunswick Environmental Network appreciates all applications, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Summer Job: NBEN Communications and Special Projects Assistant

Thursday, 29 March 2018
by Raissa Marks
Here’s your chance to join a dynamic and passionate team while contributing to New Brunswick’s environmental movement! 

Employer: New Brunswick Environmental Network, a non-profit, bilingual communication network linking over 100 environmental groups across the province. The network is the heartbeat of New Brunswick’s environmental movement, with a mission “to encourage and facilitate networking and communication among member groups in order to advance their work, to protect the Earth, to promote ecologically sound ways of life and to strengthen the environmental movement in New Brunswick.”

Salary: $12.00 / hour for 37.5 hours per week

Term of employment: Summer student position (up to 14 weeks) with a flexible start date finishing by August 31, 2018; Monday to Friday during office hours, with possibility of occasional evening and weekend work

Location: Moncton, New Brunswick

Position Requirements: To be eligible for this position you must:
  • have been a full-time student in the semester preceding the job
  • intend to return to full-time studies in the semester following the job
Duties and Responsibilities:
  • Provide assistance to NBEN member groups in communicating with other community environmental groups both provincially and nationally
  • Prepare and distribute regular e-mail correspondence to NBEN members regarding upcoming opportunities, special events, and news-worthy items
  • Update the NBEN’s brochures and other promotional material to reflect recent changes in organizational branding
  • Assist in the coordination of the NBEN’s Eco-Confluence, an event that will bring together community environmental groups, New Brunswick youth, Francophone and Anglophone New Brunswickers, and Indigenous groups to discuss and explore community involvement in environmental issues
  • Assist in updating the NBEN website
  • Assist in the coordination meetings and teleconferences.
  • Other duties as assigned.
 Requirements:
• Organizational and coordination skills
• Strong oral and written communications skills in English and French
• Strong computer skills
• Out-going and personable

Assets:
• Capable of working in a flexible work environment
• Ability to work independently but also a co-operative team player
• Quick learner and a highly motivated self-starter
• Creative and resourceful
• Background in the environmental or non-profit sector
• Interest in or passion for environmental issues

How to Apply: Please send resume and cover letter to Raissa Marks, Executive Director, nben@nben.ca

Application deadline: Friday, April 20, 2018

While the New Brunswick Environmental Network appreciates all applications, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Upcoming Events


Mass organising call: We need urgent action stop Kinder Morgan
Thu, Apr 19th, 2018


Tobique 4th Annual Spring Pow Wow
Sat, Apr 21st, 2018
Tobique Narrows

Corn Hill Nursery: Grafting Seminar
Sat, Apr 21st, 2018
Corn Hill

Action Alerts

Conserve Our NB

Friday, 09 February 2018
by Nature Trust of New Brunswick

For countless generations, people in New Brunswick have cherished the wildlife and beauty of their natural surroundings. We have adopted many deeply rooted outdoor traditions that take us to the rivers, lakes, wetlands, forests, and coastlines of our beautiful province in all seasons of the year. Help protect the wild places that you love so that your family, children, and grandchildren will be able to enjoy them forever.

Over 95% of New Brunswick is currently unprotected and open to exploitation that could harm wildlife and damage the natural beauty of our province, and we need to act now to change that.

Through the Convention on Biological Diversity, Canada has signed on to conserve 17% of land and freshwater by 2020.  As Canadians, it is our shared responsibility to hold the government accountable to achieving this target. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is urging you to speak out to your provincial representatives to declare your support for increased land conservation in the province, and encourage them to set set their own conservation goals for the province and develop an action plan to achieve these goalsThrough Pathway to Canada Target 1, an Indigenous Circle of Experts (ICE) has been identified to ensure all elements of the initiative are guided by Indigenous experts across Canada, which should be reflected in New Brunswick’s efforts as well.

A vast majority of Canadians agree that protecting the environment is one of the most important issues currently facing our country. In a recent national conservation survey, 87% of Canadians support increasing the amount of natural areas protected from development, including at national parks. Join the growing movement of people who are speaking out in support of land conservation.

We’ve made it easy for you to take action! It takes less than a minute with our online template to send a letter to your local MLA. To learn more about what you can do to support land conservation, download the Conserve Our NB toolkit.  

Printable pledge link: http://www.naturetrust.nb.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Conserve-Our-NB-Pledge.pdf  Please help by joining the movement and collecting signatures from your corner of the province to show support for increased land and freshwater protection in NB. 

Please return pledge sheets with original signatures to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick office.
Next Deadline: March 13, 2018

By mail:
P.O. Box 603 Station A,
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A6 

In person: 404 Queen St. 3rd floor,
Fredericton, NB

Have your say on Draft Water Strategy!

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
by Conservation Council of New Brunswick
A Water Strategy for New Brunswick

On October 6, 2017, the department of Environment and Local Government released a draft water strategy for comments. The draft strategy is available on the government website. Comments can be submitted by email to: waterstrategy-strategiedeleau@gnb.ca or by mail to: Department of Environment and Local Government, Policy and Planning Division, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5H1. Comments will be accepted until November 20, 2017.

In order to help groups with their submissions, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, in cooperation with watershed groups, has put together key elements of a watershed strategy and a sample letter to send to the Department.

Summary​ ​of​ ​8​ ​Key​ ​Elements​ ​of​ ​a​ ​Strong​ ​Water​ ​Protection​ ​Strategy

New​ ​Brunswick​ ​deserves​ ​a​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy​ ​that:
    1. is​​ ​​science-based;​ ​(involving​ ​baseline​ ​data,​ ​tracking​ ​and​ ​taking​ ​into​ ​consideration cumulative​ ​impacts,​ ​environmental​ ​flows)
    2. sets​ ​water​ ​quality​ ​standards​ ​within​ ​a​ ​working,​ ​legal​ ​mechanism;
    3. conserves​ ​all​ ​water​ ​within​ ​​watersheds​ ​including​ ​surface​ ​waters​ ​(lakes,​ ​streams,​ ​rivers) and​ ​groundwater,​ ​by​ ​developing​ ​good​ ​conservation​ ​plans,​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​practices,​ ​and uses​ ​the​ ​precautionary​ ​principle​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guiding,​ ​legally​ ​enforceable​ ​tool;
    4. protects​ ​our​ ​marine​ ​coastal​ ​areas​ ​in​ ​law;
    5. has​ ​a​ ​meaningful​ ​form​ ​of​ ​​co-governance​ ​with​ ​First​ ​Nations;
    6. includes​ ​the​ ​development,​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​enforcement​ ​of​ ​watershed​ ​protection plans,​ ​developed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​transparent​ ​manner,​ ​involving​ ​government,​ ​businesses,​ ​watershed organizations,​ ​farmers,​ ​municipal​ ​officials,​ ​and​ ​citizens;
    7. is​ ​accountable,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​ongoing​ ​monitoring​ ​and​ ​annual​ ​reporting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public​ ​on the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​goals​ ​and​ ​objectives​ ​outlined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy;​ ​and,
    8. is​​ ​enforceable​ ​through​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​legal​ ​framework
Sample Letter
 My name is ______, and I am writing to express my support for a strong Water Strategy in New Brunswick.

I live near ______ OR I live in ___________ watershed

Describe your favourite spot to fish/swim/paddle etc.

Share your favourite water memory.

Clean, healthy water is important to me because _____________.

Have you recently experienced a boil water order? Blue-green algae? Extreme weather? Describe what is of concern to you.

I applaud the provincial government for moving forward on its commitment to protecting our water; however I believe the draft strategy does not go far enough to ensure healthy water for my watershed.

We need a water protection strategy that (Insert one or multiple key elements).

I am afraid that if left unattended, my watershed will face ongoing and increasing treats from (pollution, wetland and coastal estuary loss, loss of adequate environmental flow to sustain aquatic life, and increasing climate change impacts such as floods, droughts, and high temperatures.)

Please protect my watershed by implementing a strong water protection strategy with modern legislation that (note key element(s)) to ensure the health of our water and people.

Thank you,
Your name.

For more information, visit the CCNB's website.