MEDIA RELEASE

SSNB files request for spraying costs
Fredericton – Feb. 5

Today, Stop Spraying New Brunswick, Inc. (SSNB) filed an official request seeking to learn how much the taxpayer pays to have forestry companies spray glyphosate-based herbicides on Crown forests.

It’s important for the public to know how much they are subsidizing big forestry companies,” stated Vern Faulkner, a director with the non-profit advocacy group. The Right to Information and Privacy Protection Act request, better known as a freedom of information request, asks for total costs spent in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

In 2015, the Auditor-General filed an official report where she revealed the government spent approximately of $2 million each year to fund glyphosate-based herbicide spraying on Crown forests.

This support given to private forestry amounted to $2.05 million in 2009, $1.92 million in 2010, $2.25 million in 2011, and $2.09 million in 2012.

Many of the supporters of SSNB believe the province, by allowing the application of glyphosate on Crown forests, has not done enough to protect the environment. This view is supported by a growing number of peer-reviewed scientific studies, but SSNB also wishes to highlight the costs the taxpayer incurs.

Simply put, the government spends taxpayer’s money supporting private forestry company activity on public land,” said Faulkner. “It’s a subsidy, nothing less, and the voter – as we approach an election – should know how much we’re paying.”

The government now has 30 days to respond to the Right to Information and Privacy Protection Act request.
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Source for financial claims: 2015 Auditor-General’s report, volume 2, p. 127
           Understanding / Fresh Water Habitat / Watercourse / Restoration Workshop

                      Irving Center Bouctouche NB February 22nd, 2018 09:00 to 15:30

Morning Session

 1) Introduction
 2) Why do we do habitat/watercourse restoration?
 3) How do we implement a habitat/watercourse restoration project?
 4) What are our expected outcomes of a habitat/watercourse restoration project?
 5) How do we know if habitat/watercourse restoration projects are successful?

Afternoon Session

 1) What creates aquatic habitat?
 2) What are river processes?
 3) How are river processes applied to a habitat/watercourse restoration project?
 4) Why is understanding river processes important to habitat/watercourse restoration project?
 5) Regulators/Funders Responsibilities
 6) Who is the most important client?

Please contact dkalex@xplornet.ca if you would like to attend.
​Nature Moncton March Meeting.
Date: March 20, 2018.
Time: 7:00pm.
Location: Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge (across from Cabela’s)
Speaker: Laura Tranquilla.

Wetlands provide a vast array of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, wetlands have been rapidly declining in number, size, and quality throughout North America. Those that remain are threatened by pollution, filling, draining, and other human impacts. Many marsh-dependent species have been affected, and are in need of monitoring, protection, and recovery efforts.
In Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, conservation organizations have secured and stewarded close to 940,000 hectares of wetland habitat! However, valuation of wetland conservation in terms of hectares says little about the biodiversity and functions these wetlands provide. To fill this gap, Bird Studies Canada, with support from partners, launched the Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program in 2012.
Join Bird Studies Canada Atlantic Program Manager, Laura Tranquilla as she talks about the Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program’s efforts to date, directions for the future, and ways to participate.

For more information on Bird Studies Canada’s Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program please visit: http://www.birdscanada.org/volunteer/acmmp/
Help NB Community Harvest Gardens bring farming back as a viable career choice in New Brunswick.  The Hayes Urban Teaching Farm pilot program is set to launch this Spring 2018. 

Farming practices taught will be regenerative, human-scale and relationship-based, positively impacting:
  • Climate change
  • Meaningful job creation
  • Food security & food sovereignty
  • Revitalization of our urban & rural communities
For more about this exciting project and how you can help:
https://chuffed.org/project/hayes-teaching-farm

DSC 0417Please share widely with your own network of folks!  

Contact:  Claire May - hayesteachingfarm@gmail.com
voices
Village of Gagetown Adopts Declaration of Environmental Rights
written by Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities

On Monday Jan 15th, about 20 citizens turned out on a snowy wintery evening for the Village of Gagetown Council meeting, held at the Village Rec Council. They were there to see the Village Council issue its Environmental Rights Declaration in support of the Blue Dot movement. Blue Dot is an initiative of the David Suzuki Foundation that works toward the right to a healthy environment for all Canadians.

The Village’s Declaration was an outcome of the recent video presentation “Green Rights”: the Human Right to a Healthy World”, hosted by the local group Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities. It was presented by renowned author and filmmaker, Silver Donald Cameron. "I'm absolutely thrilled that our screening of Green Rights in Gagetown last fall has prompted the community to make this splendid Declaration," says Cameron. "My colleagues and I spent several years creating the film, and the whole idea was to promote this kind of change. The people of Gagetown should feel very proud of what they've done."

Following the meeting, Mayor Mike Blaney said, “It was truly our pleasure to support such an important movement.” He went on to observe, “ No longer can we be indifferent to the immense negative impact we have had on the Earth. As an individual we often feel there is nothing that we can do to effect change in the bigger picture. I hope that as an individual community the Village of Gagetown can increasingly become an example to other communities by striving to provide the appropriate attention, consideration and respect to that which has been provided and given to us since the dawn of time. It is not a question of whether we should or should not do this, the question is, “Do we have the right to diminish nature’s ability to sustain our future generations?"

By reading this Declaration into the minutes of the January 15, 2018 Council meeting, Council’s beliefs and intentions are a matter of public record.

1. It demonstrates Council’s recognition that all people should have the right to live in a healthy environment, including the right to breathe clean air, drink clean water, consume safe food, to access nature, to know about pollutants and contaminants released into the local environment, and the right to participate in decision-making that will affect the environment.

2. It demonstrates Council’s leadership in building a healthy, sustainable community.

3. It signals Council’s willingness to consider environmental implications when making decisions.

4. It helps to inspire action at other levels of government.

The interest in these declarations has spread throughout the country where citizens favour healthy and clean environments for our children and grandchildren. One hundred sixty-two municipalities have approved Green Rights Declarations across Canada. Five towns and cities in New Brunswick have shown some interest, while only two - the Town of Sackville and the Village of Gagetown - have approved their own declarations.

If you are interested in the work of Voices, and have skills that you would like to offer, check out our Facebook page (Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities) or contact us by email. We currently have more items on our Priority List than we have resources.

https://www.facebook.com/VoicesGagetown/
IMG 3499

A leak of a highly-flammable gas at Irving Oil’s operations forced roughly 65 people from their homes in an east Saint John neighbourhood on Monday, Jan. 8.

The CBC reported on the butane leak at Irving Oil’s Saint John East Terminal after the company announced on Twitter that it had discovered the rupture during “routine testing.”

As of Wednesday morning, the residents from roughly 30 homes over four streets still could not return home.

Irving says it doesn’t know what caused the rupture in the pipe, which runs from the east terminal to the Irving Oil refinery, nor when it started or how much of the gas was released.

Butane is a colourless, highly-flammable gas that, if inhaled, can cause nausea, asphyxia (oxygen deprivation causing unconsciousness, suffocation or death) and arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat).

Kelsey Fillmore, a resident of the affected neighbourhood, told CBC that she and her husband could smell a “nauseating” odour as early as Friday, Jan. 5.

“I guess my big concern about that is, if it’s been leaking for a few days, how come alarms haven’t been going off since then?” Fillmore told CBC.

Emergency crews are looking into a possible connection between the smell and the leak.

A spokesperson for the Department of Energy told CBC it’s too soon to say whether Irving Oil will face charges for the leak.

The Saint John Fire Department announced the leak had been stopped during a morning media briefing on Tuesday, Jan. 9.

Clean-up of the liquid butane spill at 350 Bayside Dr. is still underway. The major east Saint John artery remains closed to all traffic between the Courtenay Bay Causeway and Red Head Road.
Today until Jan. 19 we are putting the vote to you! We visited five beautiful places in New Brunswick as part of our #MyNatureNB photo and storytelling contest, now we need your help to choose your favourite!!

Visit http://www.naturenb.ca/mynaturenb-photo-and-storytelling-c…/ and vote for the video/photo/story you like the best. You can vote once per day!!This project was funded by the Government of Canada*****************
D’aujourd’hui jusqu’au 19 janvier nous vous demandons de voter! Nous avons visité cinq endroits magnifiques au Nouveau-Brunswick comme partie de notre concours de photos et d’histoires #MaNatureNB, et nous avons maintenant besoin de votre aide afin de choisir le lieu gagnant!Visitez http://www.naturenb.ca/manaturenb-concours/ et votez pour le vidéo/ la photo /l’histoire que vous préférez. Vous pouvez voter une fois par jour !!Ce projet a été financé par le Gouvernement du Canada.
Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director, released the following statement with respect to today’s announcement about a provincial water strategy:

“The provincial water strategy released today includes short-term and long-term actions that demonstrate what can happen when citizens and groups like the Conservation Council speak up for clean water.

Introducing a new water protection act over the next two years — legislation that will both make watershed protection action plans mandatory and legally enforceable and set science-based water quality standards — is a big move, and a smart one.

The commitment to develop a coastal protection regulation over the next few months that would protect wetlands, estuaries and important coastal habitat like eelgrass stands out for me, and it is an important step to protect towns and villages all along the Northumberland Strait.

Adding a recreational water monitoring program for all provincial parks — slated to be ready for summer 2018 — will protect young and old swimmers who cool off in our favourite places like Parlee Beach and the Mactaquac headpond.

With this strategy, New Brunswick is one step closer to having the modern protections we need to ensure the health of our communities and waters, including our beloved beaches, rivers, lakes, streams, bays, wetlands and drinking water supplies.”

The development of the provincial water strategy was informed by recommendations from the Technical Working Group on Watershed Management. Lois Corbett participated in the working group since its formation in 2017.Recommended links:

We are thrilled to let you know that we are publishing a special edition of our magazine, the NB Naturalist, on Nature, Biodiversity and Climate Change.The magazine is free, and is ready for mailing by the end of November. We would like to make it available across the province, please let us know if you are interested in helping with the distribution in your region. The edition is fully translated. Please fill in the form here: https://goo.gl/forms/IdGVeuUJQOwBqj8o2.

If you have any questions, please contact us: 506-459-4209

 

Vol 44 No 3 Nov 2017 P1 3

 

CCNB logo HR
FREDERICTON —
 Lois Corbett, Executive Director, issued the following statement regarding today’s announcement about climate change legislation. She is available for comment.

“I’m pleased the province has followed the Conservation Council’s advice, and that of the Auditor General, by enshrining climate change targets in law. It is not clear, however, that climate fund the bill sets up will go far enough to protect the health and safety of New Brunswick families and communities already suffering from extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding caused by climate change.

There are no new incentives, financial or otherwise, to innovate, reduce pollution or change behaviours. By toeing the status quo, the government has missed its goal of helping N.B. transition to a low-carbon economy and create jobs.

It is an uninspiring follow-up to last December’s climate change action plan, which was a smart road map for climate action and job creation that was among the best in the country. And I sorely doubt it will meet the bar set by the federal government.

Instead, we have legislation that largely maintains the status quo and sets us on a race to the bottom when it comes to protecting the health and safety of New Brunswickers and taking advantage of the economic opportunities that come with ambitious climate action.

There are some good things in the bill: it requires the Minister to report on how the money in the Climate Change Fund is spent every year; it requires the government to report annually on the progress of its Climate Change Action Plan; and it enshrines in law the government’s carbon pollution reduction targets.”

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Recommended Links: To arrange an interview, contact:Jon MacNeill, Communications Director, 238-3539 (m) | 458-8747 (w) | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
CCNB logo HRAttention News Editors: Here is some background that may be helpful in reporting on Environment and Local Government Minister Serge Rousselle’s comments today about a carbon-pricing system for New Brunswick:
  • To date, Canadian jurisdictions that have announced or implemented a system for pricing carbon include Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, and, now, New Brunswick.
  • In June 2017, New Brunswick’s Auditor General delivered a substantive review of the province’s climate change plan, including recommendations to turn policy intentions into on-the-ground work to protect homes and communities from what she called “one of the greatest challenges for communities, governments and corporations in the coming decades.” Among other things, the review called for an aggressive timeline and full details on how the government plans to execute the 118 actions laid out in its Climate Change Action Plan.
  • New Brunswick’s Climate Change Action Plan, released in December 2016, contained all the elements for effective climate action in N.B., including commitments to Premier-led governance, target-driven policies, and sources of funding to support programs for low-income families, homeowners, and industry. It also included several measures called for by the Legislative Select Committee on Climate Change, including legislating carbon pollution reduction targets and energy-efficiency improvement targets, and phasing out coal from electricity production and phasing in more renewable energy like solar, wind, biomass and hydro.
  • One month after the climate change plan was released, New Brunswickers experienced a sobering example of climate change impacts at home with the January 2017 ice storm that led to two people dying from carbon monoxide poisoning and nearly 300,000 homes and businesses left without power, some for up to 13 days. NB Power estimates the damages to its infrastructure at $30-million, making it the most expensive restoration in the utility's history.
  • New Brunswickers are keenly aware that climate change is already happening in their communities in the forms of more extreme ice storms, hurricanes and flooding events. The Ice Storm Review 2017, released in August 2017, provided a snapshot of climate change-related extreme weather events in New Brunswick, including but not limited to:
    • Hurricane Arthur in July 2014, which brought torrential rains and 100-km/hour winds that caused road closures and washouts and significant infrastructure damages across the province. The total damages were estimated at $12.5 million.
    • A Nor-easter in December 2014 which impacted 56 roads with flooding or washouts across several regions, with impacts primarily concentrated in the Moncton region. Damages totalled $10.3 million.
    • Extreme flooding and storm surges in December 2010 which resulted in $13.8 million in damages from flooding in Charlotte and York Counties, and $3 million in damages associated with storm surges affecting the east and northeast coasts of the province.

Jon MacNeill
Communications DirectorConservation Council of New Brunswick/
Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick
458-8747 | 238-3539
On December 7, 2017, 23 groups signed on to a statement addressing the low-carbon economy.  To read the complete statement, click here

The statement calls on the government of New Brunswick to:
  • adopt the establishment of the Low-Carbon Economy as the base for a stable and more resilient economy starting in 2018;
  • include transparent safeguards preventing the possibility to hide or misrepresent emission and carbon credit figures;
  • ensure success by not allowing “output-based pricing,” revenue neutrality measures and other backsliding measures from corporate and consumer interest groups;
  • allow no grace period in fully implementing the carbon pricing program, or give away carbon credits rather than sell them to industries that pollute under the cap-and-trade regime; and
  • invest and reinvest all provincial carbon tax revenues in clean energy, clean transportation and infrastructure, and energy efficiency.
The statement is signed by:
Association for the protection of marshes and beaches at l'Aboiteau
Bathurst Sustainable Development
Citizens Coalition for Clean Air – Saint John, NB
Concerned Citizens of Saint John
Council of Canadians – Atlantic
Council of Canadians – Kent County Chapter
Department of Geography and Environment, Mount Allison University
East Brûlé Citizens for Protected Wetlands and Beaches 
Esgenoopetitj Watershed Association
Friends of Rockwood Park, INC. – Saint John, NB
Green Light – Grand Falls, NB
NB Anti-Shale Gas Alliance
New Brunswickers Against Fracking – Doaktown, NB
OCIA Atlantic
PEACE-NB
Recherche Indépendante de Retraité en Écologie
Red Dot Association of Shediac Bay
Sierra Club Canada Foundation Atlantic Canada Chapter
Sustainable Energy Group – Woodstock, NB
Taymouth Environmental Action
University of New Brunswick Saint John Green Society
Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities – Village of Gagetown, NB
West/Ouest Brûlé Ltd.
2017 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award of Excellence in Land Conservation Winner Announced


Fredericton, New Brunswick (Nov 29, 2017) – Dr. James (Jim) Goltz, a renowned veterinary pathologist, Manager of Veterinary Laboratory Services for the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and dedicated volunteer naturalist has been honoured with the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation. Dr. Goltz’s dedication to supporting conservation organizations in New Brunswick has made a significant impact on the progress of land conservation efforts in our beautiful province.

"I am delighted to recognize the long and dedicated work of Dr. Jim Goltz, "says Lt-Gov Jocelyne Roy Vienneau. "He serves as an inspiration for everyone try‎ing to make a 'green' difference. His is a wonderful New Brunswick story from which we can all learn."

A true leader in the conservation field in our province, Dr. Goltz has been an active field botanist for nearly 30 years, with a special interest in the flora of New Brunswick. From nature walks, to sitting on committees, and caring for natural areas, his enthusiasm in the conservation field continues to make a significant impact today. As a dedicated volunteer for the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Jim has led nature walks at preserve openings, stewarded nature preserves by monitoring rare species of flora and fauna, and continues to provide advice regarding species identification and management activities. Jim is always willing to share his wisdom. These are just a small testament to Jim’s long history as a conservationist.

“For such a small province, New Brunswick has an incredibly rich biodiversity with many natural history wonders worthy of protection and global recognition. Soon after I moved here in the mid-1980s, I fell in love with the province, especially the beautiful river valleys, magnificent forests, spectacular wetlands and diverse coastlines, and the many wild plants and animals that reside here.” Says Dr. Goltz, “The province’s strong reliance on natural resources continues to put tremendous pressure on the landscapes and wildlife, including plants and animals, that human residents of the province and visitors so deeply cherish and take for granted.  It’s a profound and humbling  honour to be recognized among the cadre of dedicated conservationists who are working tirelessly to preserve the species and natural ecosystems of this province.  I am especially delighted to witness amazing progress in protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest remnants in the St. John River Valley, thanks to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, the Meduxnekeag River Association, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the communities and many people who support them.”

“On behalf of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, our team would like to extend a congratulations to Dr. Goltz. His considerable work in conservation in New Brunswick makes Jim an excellent recipient for this year’s award.” Says Vince Zelazny, President of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, “Jim can identify a very long list of birds, amphibians, reptiles, butterflies, moths, and is without a doubt among the most hard-working and well-rounded field naturalists in Canada. We are pleased to join our Honorary Patron, The Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, to give thanks to those who contribute so much to the excellent work being done in land conservation in our province.”

“With top-notch credentials, expert knowledge of botany and ornithology, and a passion for exploration, he could have pursued his professional career, and made his home and name as a naturalist, in any part of Canada or elsewhere. He chose New Brunswick. Perhaps it was love at first sight—I don’t know. But clearly, he soon fell for the place and people here. He realized that, for an area of its size, New Brunswick has a remarkably varied and interesting natural environment.” Says Stephen Clayden, Curator at the New Brunswick Museum and Jim’s longtime friend, “In short order he got to know naturalists and others around the province, and became widely known and admired for his extraordinary generosity. He has freely shared his expert knowledge of flora and fauna, led countless outings, and lent his time and organizational skills to many groups and projects.”

“Each and every nature foray here still evokes for me an incredible sense of awe and wonder.  Through leading nature forays, sharing my enthusiasm for nature and showing people photographs of nature’s treasures, I hope that others will be inspired to learn more about nature, do whatever they can to pass on their love and knowledge, and translate these into conservation actions.  I very much appreciate New Brunswick’s scientists, naturalists, outdoor enthusiasts and other experts who continue to graciously and generously share their wealth of knowledge with me and others, feeding our insatiable curiosity to learn more about the world around us.” Says Dr. Goltz.

Dr. Goltz will be awarded the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation by the Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau at Government House in Fredericton on Wednesday, November 28th during the annual award ceremony.

About the Award
The Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation was established in 2012 to mark the 25th anniversary of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick. Previous recipients of the award have included the late Mary Majka, the Meduxnekeag River Association, Roberta Clowater, and the late Don Dennison. As the Honorary Patron of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, Lieutenant-Governor Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, presents the annual award in recognition of an individual or organization that has made significant contributions to the protection of natural heritage through stewardship, volunteerism, donation of lands or building effective partnerships. In 2015, the Donald G. Dennison Nature Trust of New Brunswick Legacy Fund was created from memorial donations to the Nature Trust following Don’s death from cancer. His family established the Legacy Fund in Don’s honour. 

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable land conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 7,000 acres (2,700 hectares) in more than 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.
(St. Andrews, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick has been presented with another opportunity to extend the iconic Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, near St. Andrews.

The beautiful 600-acre Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve features more than 9 km of hiking trails that lead through various ecosystems and forests. This preserve is enjoyed year-round by hikers, kayakers, and snowshoers. The Nature Trust is currently in the final stages of acquiring a 12.5-acre extension that will provide a buffer to the Sam Orr’s Pond and allow for the extension of the nature trail.

The J T Clark Family Foundation has generously pledged to match any further donations to the Nature Trust’s fundraising campaign, up to $3500. “We are very thankful for the continued support from the Clark Foundation.” says Nature Trust President, Vince Zelazny. “The Clark Foundation has supported many other nature preserve acquisitions in the past. We are excited to continue this partnership and secure this important extension at Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve, and ask the public to help the Nature Trust reach its fundraising goal for this important extension.”

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve is designated under the Protected Natural Areas Act, which provides the highest level of protection possible and helps to support the diverse wildlife that seek refuge in the rich wetlands and forests. In addition to providing crucial habitat for wildlife, the preserve sees hundreds of visitors each year. “Caughey-Taylor is truly a gem in the Bay of Fundy area.” says Caughey Taylor Nature Preserve volunteer and Board member, Walter Emrich. “With an extensive trail system, visitors to the preserve are taken through various ecosystems and breathtaking lookouts as they make their way to Berry Point, the last stop on the trail.”

The Nature Trust has pushed the property closing date to December, and needs support from the community to complete this extension. Donations to the fundraising campaign can be made online via Chuffed at https://chuffed.org/project/caughey-taylor-extension or by calling the Nature Trust office at (506) 457 2398.

Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve can be found on Route 127 in Bocabec, 12 km north of St. Andrews. You can learn more about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve by visiting www.naturetrust.nb.ca. If you have any questions about Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve or the fundraising campaign, please contact Renata at renata.woodward@ntnb.org.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.

October 31, 2017
(For immediate release)

Fredericton, NEW BRUNSWICK. A retired research scientist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment and expert on genetically modified foods, Dr. Thierry Vrain, will be in New Brunswick between October 30 and November 2, 2017, where he will be presenting his findings to the public in four communities: St. Louis-de-Kent, Edmundston, Petitcodiac and Fredericton Junction.

Dr. Vrain worked for 30 years as a research sci­en­tist for the Canadian gov­ern­ment in Québec and British Columbia where he con­ducted research on genet­i­cally mod­i­fied pota­toes, among other projects. In British Columbia, Dr. Vrain was section Head of the Biotechnology and Nematology sections at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre (Agriculture Canada) in Summerland.

The most common genetically engineered crops have been modified to be resistant to glyphosate-based herbicides such as Monsanto’s Round-Up, and this has been a major focus of Dr. Vrain’s work. For the past decade, he has been travelling the world to inform the public of the unacceptable risks that glyphosate poses to human health and the environment.

In New Brunswick glyphosate-based herbicides are widely sprayed on agricultural land and on forests or softwood plantations to kill off hardwoods that might complete with conifers planted for pulp and other low-value wood products.

Dr. Vrain’s visit could not be more timely. The subject of herbicide spraying on public forests and on NB Power right-of-ways is garnering a great deal of public attention and provoking widespread protest, spearheaded by the work of the Stop Spraying NB movement (Facebook Group: Stop Spraying in New Brunswick).

In recent years, glyphosate has come under a great deal of scrutiny world-wide. In 2015, the World Health Organization’s research arm labelled glyphosate a “probable carcinogen” and in 2017, a long-term study published in Science Reports linked “chronic ultra-low dose” exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides with liver disease in rats.  The same year documents unsealed by court order in the United States revealed collusion between an official in the Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto to falsify academic reports and stifle others to give glyphosate-based herbicides a clean bill of health. More recently, California has added glyphosate to its list of cancer-causing agents that must come with a warning label. 

In New Brunswick, a number of municipalities, including Moncton, Cap Pelé, Tracadie, Miscou, Tide Head, Paquetville, Sackville and community groups such as the Saint-Quentin and Cap Pelée/Beaubassin-Est Chambers of Commerce, have publicly expressed their support of the Stop Spraying NB movement by either sending letters of concern to provincial government or signing a resolution against spraying in our forests and under NB Power lines.

The movement to stop pesticide spraying in New Brunswick on public lands and under NB Power lines is rapidly gaining momentum. Signs calling for an end to the spraying are popping up all over New Brunswick. At the Union of Municipalities Tradeshow on September 29, 2017, municipal politicians and staff noted that, “there are signs everywhere.”

More than 35,000 people have already signed a petition to stop the spraying, with more coming in every day. Citizens of this province are growing more and more aware of the immense value of their diverse Acadian forests, their wildlife, their drinking water, their rivers and lakes, forest foods, and their health. They are demanding a ban on the spraying of herbicide on their woodlands.

Dr. Vrain’s presentations are of utmost importance, focusing as they do on the research that Health Canada is choosing to ignore, the negative effects of glyphosate residue in and on edible plants, including the berries, mushrooms, medicinal plants that NB citizens gather in our forests, and which wildlife depend on for their survival.

Dr. Thierry Vrain’s public presentations are being hosted and funded by local community groups, together with a number of grassroots organizations that are listed below, and will help the public become better informed about scientific knowledge on long-term, low-dose exposure to glyphosate.

Wednesday, November 1, 7-9 pm
Maritime Motorsports Hall of fame
Petitcodiac, NB
(Organized in collaboration with SSNB Inc.)

Thursday, November 2, 7-9 pm
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55
159 Sunbury Drive
Fredericton Junction, NB
(Organized in collaboration with The Right Not To Be Poisoned)

CONTACTS:
(English) Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D'Arcy (Chair, SSNB Inc.): 506-292-7503 email: caroline@stopsprayingnb.ca www.stopsprayingnb.ca
(English) Morris Shannon (Right not to be Poisoned): (506) 455-4232 email: 245tmo@gmail.com
(French)  Francine Levesque (Écovie): 506-284-2769  email: canot@explornet.ca

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

30 Days of Biodiversity

(Fredericton, NB) Across New Brunswick, local organizations are supporting the conservation of biodiversity through research, restoration, and education initiatives, which engage people in their communities. These organizations are passionate about promoting and protecting biodiversity in our beautiful province. Many of these initiatives will be featured in the new 30 Days of Biodiversity campaign, which will run through the month of October. The New Brunswick Biodiversity Collaborative will be promoting one initiative per day on social media and various websites.
"We are so fortunate in New Brunswick to have such a rich natural heritage,” said Nadine Ives with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “New Brunswickers care about nature and it's wonderful that so many groups and individuals are sharing their passion for species and habitats and working hard to understand and protect them. We are delighted to feature these great initiatives through our '30 Days for Biodiversity’ campaign." You can check out all the initiatives here: http://nben.ca/en/biodiversity-initiatives-in-new-brunswick

During “30 Days of Biodiveristy”, initiatives from more than 20 organizations will be featured. Examples of these initiatives include the New Brunswick Alliance of Lake Associations’s Invasive Plant Patrol Program, which aims to prevent the introduction and spread of non-native plant species. These invaders can cause habitat destruction, and loss of plant and animal communities, and other problems. Another program, hosted by Nature NB since 2016, has been producing guides for children that they can use to identify birds, frogs, trees and more in their own backyards. These are available in both French and English, and are free for any child in New Brunswick.

These are just two of the many biodiversity initiatives in our province.  Environmental groups, community groups, researcher, and others are encouraged to submit their initiatives to be featured, which can be done here: http://nben.ca/en/biodiversity-initiatives-in-new-brunswick.

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About Biodiversity: Biological diversity, or biodiversity for short, refers to the variety of all living things, as well as the ecosystems and natural processes that support them. The province of New Brunswick has a provincial strategy that focuses on conserving biodiversity and using biological resources in a sustainable manner. The provincial strategy aligns with the Canadian Biodiversity Strategy established to support Canada’s obligations to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, which provides a Strategic Plan for Biodiversity, including the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, for the 2011-2020 period.

About the Collaborative Effort on Biodiversity in New Brunswick: The Collaborative Effort on Biodiversity in New Brunswick is a multi-stakeholder effort to address the protection of biodiversity and species-at-risk. The aim of the collaborative is to work together to enhance stewardship activities on the ground and provide a comprehensive approach to the protection of biodiversity in the province. Involved agencies are diverse; the collaborative brings together citizens’ conservation and environmental groups, federal, provincial, and municipal government, academics and researchers, rural and municipal planners, and businesses to work in a spirit of cooperation.

Media Contacts

Raissa Marks, New Brunswick Environmental Network, raissa.marks@nben.ca | 506-855-4144

Nadine Ives, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, nadine@conservationcouncil.ca | 506-458-8747

Curtis Richardson, Nature Trust of New Brunswick, curtis.richardson@ntnb.org | 506-457-2398
Conservation on Canvas, an Exhibition of paintings of New Brunswick’s Nature Trust Nature Preserves by artist Michael McEwing, opens at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th



(Saint John, NB) - In celebration of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick’s 30th anniversary, Conservation on Canvas, an exhibition of paintings featuring Nature Trust of New Brunswick Nature Preserves by New Brunswick artist and art educator Michael McEwing opens at the New Brunswick Museum on Thursday, 5 October 2017, from 5-7 PM.  The exhibition, a partnership between the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the New Brunswick Museum showcases the natural beauty of New Brunswick.  A series of 33 oil paintings captures unique ecosystems and landscapes of Nature Trust preserves from around the province. The exhibition will travel throughout New Brunswick in 2018, and will be accompanied by art-in-nature workshops, immersing visitors in the natural wonders that surround us in our beautiful province.

The project began nearly four years ago, when Michael McEwing approached the Nature Trust with the idea to capture the beauty of Nature Trust preserves on canvas. “Early on, it began to dawn on me that this project would become about more than just exploring and painting nature preserves,” says McEwing, “it has become just as much about the incredible people who have joined me on the journey. The inspiration and knowledge that has been shared from the Nature Trust board members, staff, and volunteers is now embedded in the works themselves--a merger of artistic expression and passion for the biodiversity of nature."

Featuring preserves from Grand Manan and Blacks Harbour in the lower Bay of Fundy, to Shea Lake in the North, the Conservation on Canvas exhibition is a diverse showcase of New Brunswick’s landscapes and biodiversity. McEwing explains; “This series invites the viewer to join me on this adventure of discovering the wide diversity and unique ecology of these outstanding nature preserves.”  The goal of the project is to raise awareness of the natural diversity across New Brunswick, and to celebrate land conservation as a means of ensuring these landscapes and habitat remain protected for future generations.

“The Nature Trust is proud to be continuing our partnership with the New Brunswick Museum and the art community.” says Vice President of the Nature Trust’s Board, Wayne Burley, “it has been a joy to see these paintings take shape, depicting the varying landscapes of our province, and leaving a legacy like the nature preserves they represent. The community has rallied behind this project from day one, and have supported the art-in-nature workshops we’ve hosted.”  Burley has been involved with the project as an advisor since it began.

“Our province’s landscape has been the subject of many artists’ work for over two and a half centuries – Michael McEwing’s  focused attention captures a beauty that is worthy of both our attention and our preservation efforts,“ states Peter Larocque, New Brunswick Museum Art Curator. “The New Brunswick Museum is very pleased to continue our longstanding collaboration with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and to help share the ongoing exploration of the province’s natural beauty and to showcase the talent of its contemporary artists.”

The exhibition will remain at the New Brunswick Museum until mid-January 2018.  It will travel then travel to the Andrew & Laura McCain Art Gallery in Florenceville-Bristol, the Sunbury Shores Arts & Nature Centre in Saint Andrews and the Grand Manan Art Gallery and the Grand Manan Museum.  The exhibition tour will conclude at Government House in Fredericton in fall 2018. Art-in-nature workshops and guided excursions on nearby nature preserves will accompany the exhibition at each location, led by McEwing, fellow artists, and naturalists, that will allow guests to deepen their knowledge of local biodiversity and create their own masterpieces.

All are welcome to join the artist and representatives of the organizing partners at the free exhibition opening at the New Brunswick Museum on October 5th at 5-7 PM.

Financial support for this project has also been graciously given by TD, McCain Foods, Stewart McKelvey and other supporters.

For more information:

Caitlin Griffiths or Aristi Dsilva, Communications & Marketing, New Brunswick Museum
(506) 654-7059 or (506) 643-2358
info@nbm-mnb.ca

Curtis Richardson, Communications Coordinator, Nature Trust of New Brunswick
(506) 457-2398
curtis.richardson@ntnb.org
Nature Trust to host AGM and Nature Walk on Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve

(Elgin, NB) On Sunday, October 1st from 1 to 4 pm, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick will host its Annual General Meeting at the Maple Tree Café in Elgin, New Brunswick. With the recent protection of the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in the community, the annual general meeting will be accompanied by a nature walk. Nature Trust supporters, volunteers and members will have the opportunity to meet, as well as reflect and discuss plans for the future of the organization.

“As the Nature Trust continues to celebrate its 30th anniversary celebrations, we are gearing up to begin our strategic planning sessions,” says Nature Trust President Vince Zelazny. “We have spent this summer engaging with members of communities throughout New Brunswick to learn what area of our organization is most important to them. We plan on using the data we’ve collected to help guide us during our planning.”

The Nature Trust has had a very successful year in 2016/17, conserving three new nature preserves, extending three existing preserves, and renewing a lease. The three new preserves were the Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve in Elgin, the Nelekwenekek Nature Preserve on Middle Island, and the Bonney Nature Preserve on the Kingston Peninsula. The three preserve extensions were on Caughey-Taylor Nature Preserve in Bocabec, Sugar Island Nature Preserve on the Saint John River, and at the Connors. Bros Nature Preserve at Pea Point. Finally, the lease for Shea Lake Nature Preserve, the Nature Trust’s first preserve, was renewed with Acadian Timber. The Nature Trust also grew it’s stewardship groups, implemented a new CRM, worked with landowners and harvesters on protecting the Appalachian Hardwood Forest, and held a very successful Great Fundy Cleanup in the lower Bay of Fundy, among many other great accomplishments in 2016-17.

“Looking back on this year, it’s clear that the Nature Trust has had a significant impact on New Brunswick’s natural spaces.” Says Nature Trust Executive Director, Renata Woodward. “Our conservation, stewardship, and education efforts are growing each year, with more people joining us in supporting our organization. I encourage anybody interested in learning more about protecting New Brunswick’s biodiversity to join us at our annual general meeting.”

A conservation options presentation will begin at the Maple Tree Café at 12:30, with the annual general meeting taking place from 1 to 1:45 pm. All are welcome to attend and learn more about the Nature Trust’s conservation, stewardship, and educational initiatives. Follow the meeting, there will be a guided nature walk taking place on the nearby Mapleton Acadian Forest Nature Preserve from 2:30 to 4 pm, providing a unique opportunity to experience one of the Nature Trust’s nature preserves firsthand. For more information and to attend the AGM, please contact Curtis Richardson at curtis.richardson@ntnb.org or (506) 457-2398.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick
Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,830 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca

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Logo_glow.pngConservation Council.jpg
For Immediate Release - Sept. 26, 2017

Environment and Climate Change Canada Reluctant to Enforce Regulations against Aquaculture Operators

K’JIPUKTUK/HALIFAX - A retired Environment Canada employee and conservation and environmental law groups are calling for action from the federal government after Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) confirmed certain aquaculture activities result in a disposal at sea, likely violating the federal Disposal at Sea Regulations. Despite this confirmation the activities appear to be continuing without any enforcement action by ECCC.

Aquaculture companies use a variety of drugs, disinfectants and pesticides in response to sea lice and disease on salmon, issues that come along with farming fish in the open ocean. Chemical residues and pesticides are released into the ocean after use despite limitations under the Disposal at Sea Regulations and the serious risk of harm these chemicals pose to the marine environment and wildlife.

In February 2016, retired Environment Canada employee Bill Ernst launched a formal complaint about the practice to ECCC. In his complaint, Ernst identified specific companies but noted that an industry-wide investigation was needed.

After more than a year of reviewing the complaint and undertaking investigations of activities taking place in New Brunswick, officials from ECCC confirmed to Mr. Ernst on April 25, 2017 that they had a reasonable belief that the companies he identified were violating the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 and that the department would take ‘appropriate’ enforcement action.

Yet, despite repeated requests from Ernst on how ECCC will enforce the Disposal at Sea Regulations, no clear enforcement action has happened. The aquaculture industry’s widespread practice of discharging chemicals into the marine environment continues.

Ernst, East Coast Environmental Law, West Coast Environmental Law Association, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ecology Action Centre, Living Oceans Society, and Friends of the Earth Canada are calling for an industry-wide investigation into the chemical dumping practice.

“I continue to be concerned that by the Government’s inaction. Minister McKenna is abdicating her responsibility to protect the marine environment and, in doing so, is giving the impression that the Government of Canada is willing to promote the aquaculture industry at the expense of other industries and environmental sustainability,” says Ernst.

Adds Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director with East Coast Environmental Law: “Aquaculture may be a valuable economic driver in the Atlantic Canadian economy, as are many other coastal industries, but to ensure these industries remain viable, the laws that protect the environment upon which they depend must be applied fairly and effectively. Private citizens should not bear the burden of enforcing those laws.”

“We commend Mr. Ernst for his efforts to ensure that the laws to protect our environment and coastal fisheries are being enforced,” says Matthew Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “It is disappointing that ECCC has not taken the opportunity provided by Mr. Ernst’s complaint to comprehensively investigate pesticide and other chemical use on aquaculture sites in Canadian waters. An industry-wide investigation is needed.”

The ECCC report regarding Mr. Ernst’s complaint can be viewed here.
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For more information contact:

Bill Ernst

Environment Canada retiree

Wrernst1@gmail.com, 902-865-5771


Matthew Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper

Conservation Council of New Brunswick

matt.abbott@conservationcouncil.ca 506-458-8747


Lisa Mitchell, Executive Director

East Coast Environmental Law Association

lisa@ecelaw.ca 902-670-1113

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Op-ed by Nadine Ives

There is nothing quite like that back-to-school feeling.


But what if you could capture the freedom of summer days, the exploration of experimenting and learning outside, year round?

New Brunswick is home to a dedicated and innovative group of outdoor nature educators who know how to teach, outside.

The educators behind the Great Minds Think Outside program of the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN) come from a broad range of backgrounds and disciplines, and they know their stuff. These educators know, for example, that a child who learns outside reaps benefits in physical, mental, emotional, and social development, in addition to improved academic outcomes. Math? Plot a graph of the plants found in different areas of the playground. Group objects found in nature according to colour, shape and texture.

Science and climate change? Measure temperature, rain, and snowfall and track changes over time.  Observe the life cycle of frogs in a local wetland.

Literacy? Write a story imagining a day in the life of a bug, or a tree. Use adjectives to describe the clouds.

Sometimes those who struggle in the classroom blossom when given opportunities to learn outside - and pretty well everyone loves exploring outdoors.

So it is good news that as teachers, parents and students across the province head back to class for another school year, our team of outdoor nature educators is gearing up for another season of helping teachers connect their students to the wealth of learning opportunities just outside their classroom walls. After all, in New Brunswick, nature is never far from our doorstep.

Since 2015, the Great Minds Think Outside team has visited more than 40 schools across the province to help teachers make lessons leap off the page and come alive before students' eyes in the outdoors.

The training sessions are activity-filled opportunities for teachers to experience for themselves the excitement of taking curriculum outside to see how effective it is for making memories full of important learning moments that will stay with children for years.

The activities can be adapted for any subject area, tying memorable hands-on experiential learning opportunities to the important skills and development goals outlined in the provincial curriculum. As one teacher from Sackville's Salem Elementary School said after taking the training, "this is the future of education." Many teachers who've participated in Great Minds Think Outside sessions say it is a fantastic way to reach kids who just learn better by doing, while reinforcing lessons learned previously inside the classroom. One teacher from a recent session put it best: "The more senses involved, the more movement and positive experiences, the better the learning." After taking a lesson outside, students return to the classroom with more focus and creativity, stronger recall and memory, and are better at problem-solving and working cooperatively with classmates. And it's not just the children who benefit. Teaching outside gives teachers a renewed enthusiasm for their work and promotes more innovative teaching strategies. A teacher who takes the class outside for a science lesson suddenly starts seeing ways to connect it to math, language arts, social studies and more. Talk to your child's teacher about inviting the Great Minds Think Outside team to your school. You can book a session by contacting Pascale Ouellette, the Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator with the New Brunswick Environmental Network, at 506-855-4144 or by emailing nben@nben.ca. Learn more about the program at www.nben.ca/greatminds.

Let's make sure that this year, at more and more schools across the province, going back to class does not mean going back inside!

Nadine I
ves, The Learning Outside Coordinator for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick and a founding member of the New Brunswick Environmental Network's Great Minds Think Outside program.

Learning Outside Nov2016 75

News from Groups Archives

Upcoming Events


Nature Moncton February Meeting
Tue, Feb 20th, 2018
Moncton

Film: We Carry Each Others Memories
Wed, Feb 21st, 2018
Fredericton,

Atelier de fabrication de nichoirs pour les hirondelles bicolores
Wed, Feb 21st, 2018
Cap-Pelé

Action Alerts

Conserve Our NB

Friday, 09 February 2018
by Nature Trust of New Brunswick

For countless generations, people in New Brunswick have cherished the wildlife and beauty of their natural surroundings. We have adopted many deeply rooted outdoor traditions that take us to the rivers, lakes, wetlands, forests, and coastlines of our beautiful province in all seasons of the year. Help protect the wild places that you love so that your family, children, and grandchildren will be able to enjoy them forever.

Over 95% of New Brunswick is currently unprotected and open to exploitation that could harm wildlife and damage the natural beauty of our province, and we need to act now to change that.

Through the Convention on Biological Diversity, Canada has signed on to conserve 17% of land and freshwater by 2020.  As Canadians, it is our shared responsibility to hold the government accountable to achieving this target. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is urging you to speak out to your provincial representatives to declare your support for increased land conservation in the province, and encourage them to set set their own conservation goals for the province and develop an action plan to achieve these goalsThrough Pathway to Canada Target 1, an Indigenous Circle of Experts (ICE) has been identified to ensure all elements of the initiative are guided by Indigenous experts across Canada, which should be reflected in New Brunswick’s efforts as well.

A vast majority of Canadians agree that protecting the environment is one of the most important issues currently facing our country. In a recent national conservation survey, 87% of Canadians support increasing the amount of natural areas protected from development, including at national parks. Join the growing movement of people who are speaking out in support of land conservation.

We’ve made it easy for you to take action! It takes less than a minute with our online template to send a letter to your local MLA. To learn more about what you can do to support land conservation, download the Conserve Our NB toolkit.  

Printable pledge link: http://www.naturetrust.nb.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Conserve-Our-NB-Pledge.pdf  Please help by joining the movement and collecting signatures from your corner of the province to show support for increased land and freshwater protection in NB. 

Please return pledge sheets with original signatures to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick office.
Next Deadline: March 13, 2018

By mail:
P.O. Box 603 Station A,
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A6 

In person: 404 Queen St. 3rd floor,
Fredericton, NB

Have your say on Draft Water Strategy!

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
by Conservation Council of New Brunswick
A Water Strategy for New Brunswick

On October 6, 2017, the department of Environment and Local Government released a draft water strategy for comments. The draft strategy is available on the government website. Comments can be submitted by email to: waterstrategy-strategiedeleau@gnb.ca or by mail to: Department of Environment and Local Government, Policy and Planning Division, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5H1. Comments will be accepted until November 20, 2017.

In order to help groups with their submissions, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, in cooperation with watershed groups, has put together key elements of a watershed strategy and a sample letter to send to the Department.

Summary​ ​of​ ​8​ ​Key​ ​Elements​ ​of​ ​a​ ​Strong​ ​Water​ ​Protection​ ​Strategy

New​ ​Brunswick​ ​deserves​ ​a​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy​ ​that:
    1. is​​ ​​science-based;​ ​(involving​ ​baseline​ ​data,​ ​tracking​ ​and​ ​taking​ ​into​ ​consideration cumulative​ ​impacts,​ ​environmental​ ​flows)
    2. sets​ ​water​ ​quality​ ​standards​ ​within​ ​a​ ​working,​ ​legal​ ​mechanism;
    3. conserves​ ​all​ ​water​ ​within​ ​​watersheds​ ​including​ ​surface​ ​waters​ ​(lakes,​ ​streams,​ ​rivers) and​ ​groundwater,​ ​by​ ​developing​ ​good​ ​conservation​ ​plans,​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​practices,​ ​and uses​ ​the​ ​precautionary​ ​principle​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guiding,​ ​legally​ ​enforceable​ ​tool;
    4. protects​ ​our​ ​marine​ ​coastal​ ​areas​ ​in​ ​law;
    5. has​ ​a​ ​meaningful​ ​form​ ​of​ ​​co-governance​ ​with​ ​First​ ​Nations;
    6. includes​ ​the​ ​development,​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​enforcement​ ​of​ ​watershed​ ​protection plans,​ ​developed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​transparent​ ​manner,​ ​involving​ ​government,​ ​businesses,​ ​watershed organizations,​ ​farmers,​ ​municipal​ ​officials,​ ​and​ ​citizens;
    7. is​ ​accountable,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​ongoing​ ​monitoring​ ​and​ ​annual​ ​reporting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public​ ​on the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​goals​ ​and​ ​objectives​ ​outlined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy;​ ​and,
    8. is​​ ​enforceable​ ​through​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​legal​ ​framework
Sample Letter
 My name is ______, and I am writing to express my support for a strong Water Strategy in New Brunswick.

I live near ______ OR I live in ___________ watershed

Describe your favourite spot to fish/swim/paddle etc.

Share your favourite water memory.

Clean, healthy water is important to me because _____________.

Have you recently experienced a boil water order? Blue-green algae? Extreme weather? Describe what is of concern to you.

I applaud the provincial government for moving forward on its commitment to protecting our water; however I believe the draft strategy does not go far enough to ensure healthy water for my watershed.

We need a water protection strategy that (Insert one or multiple key elements).

I am afraid that if left unattended, my watershed will face ongoing and increasing treats from (pollution, wetland and coastal estuary loss, loss of adequate environmental flow to sustain aquatic life, and increasing climate change impacts such as floods, droughts, and high temperatures.)

Please protect my watershed by implementing a strong water protection strategy with modern legislation that (note key element(s)) to ensure the health of our water and people.

Thank you,
Your name.

For more information, visit the CCNB's website.
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